The United States was hesitant to involve Commonwealth countries on an equal footing and occasionally blocked the exchange of information with them. The 1946 agreement states that the exchange of information by the secret services is « not detrimental to national interests. » After Murphy`s 1973 attacks on the headquarters of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization (ASIO), Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam learned of the UKUSA agreement. After learning of the agreement, Whitlam discovered that Pine Gap, a secret surveillance station near Alice Springs, Australia, had been operated by the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). [22] [23] [24] [25] Much of the exchange of information is via THE ultra-sensitive network of STONEGHOST, which is supposed to contain « some of the most intimate secrets of the Western world ». [11] In addition to establishing rules for the exchange of information, the agreement was formalized and the « special relationship » between the United Kingdom and the United States was consolidated. [12] [13] As part of the agreement, GCHQ and the NSA provided information on the Soviet Union, the People`s Republic of China and several Eastern European countries (known as Exotics). [19] The network was transformed into a scaly collection and analysis network in the 1960s. [20] The treaty was extended to Canada (1948), Australia (1956) and New Zealand (1956). In 1955, the agreement was updated to describe Canada, Australia and New Zealand as « Commonwealth countries cooperating with UKUSA. » [21] The other countries that joined as a « third party » were Norway (1952), Denmark (1954) and West Germany (1955). [14] Brigadier General Walter Agee, USAF, Deputy Director of secret services, « Memorandum for the Coordinator of Joint Operations: Proposed U.S.-Canadian Agreement, » June 7, 1948.

It seems likely that these elements were not substantially altered in the final version of the agreement. [3] Kevin O`Neill, Ed., History of CBNRC, 1987, Chapter 2, p. 3, published under Access to Information. The same source indicated that the Chiefs of Staff Staff Had already approved, in September 1945, the continuation of SIGINT`s peacetime activities. The war diaries of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals Special Wireless Stations also show that at least some provisional authorizations for post-war activities had taken place before March 1946. Thus, in February 1946, a new « Alford cage » antenna system was built and commissioned at Grande Prairie (War Diary: 2 Special Wireless Station, entrance for February 14, 1946, communications collection and Electronics Museum Canadian Forces). This document not only confirms the clarification of the nature of the original UKUSA agreement and how the NSA and GCHQ have adapted it over time, but it also confirms our understanding of the broad scope of the UKUSA agreement. In the « Background » section, she notes that « the basic agreement … for the exchange of all COMINT results, including the final product and relevant accompanying data …

for global objectives, unless it was expressly excluded from the agreement at the request of one of the parties » as was the case. In its high-level Findings/Conclusions, it also states that « [t]he large flow of raw interception, technical analysis results and SIGINT product between the NSA and GCHQ is significant. Another language was published in the « Results/conclusions » section. And in its latest section « Areas of Cooperation/Exchange, » it states that « the exchange of GCHQ-NSA sigint includes a variety of targets around the world, from military activities to terrorist activities [REDACTED] and [REDACTED] » and « the exchange of material (gross absorption, analysis, product) on [REDACTED]. » The document shows how the two agencies facilitate these exchanges in practice, including ensuring that « GCHQ has direct access to the NSA`s computer systems. » The United Kingdom – United States of America Agreement (UKUSA, /ju-ku-s/ew-koo-SAH)[2] is a multilateral signal intelligence cooperation agreement between the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.